[Archive] how to pronounce dawi

cornixt:

The English language has evolved over many years, and how we pronounce things today is different to how they were pronounced before spelling became consistant (there is some evidence that the k and gh in “knight” used to be pronounced) as dictionaries were constructed.

Here is a little more on ‘gh’:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gh_(digraph)#English

Hashut’s Blessing:

Tarrak: One way to bring it back on topic, lol :smiley:

Mosk: Only English people (or those that sound the same) use it correctly. Otherwise, it’s a colloquialism.

I’m actuallly mucking about, but it does irk me to no end when non-English people claim that I, who am from England and am generally well spoken, am incorrect in the pronunciation or use of something. Even worse when they say because it’s THEIR language. The name implies it is the language of my country of origin. The language and I are one, lol :stuck_out_tongue:

Anyhow, Waaagh! is prounced Waaa, not as in Waaah! (like a baby), but like Waaar (like someone bellowing a belly-throbbling version of what they want to participate in). I would rather someone said Waaag than Waaah though. Also, it amuses me that Thommy H has said it has no definitive length (which is true and I agree with), yet they have coined it to always have an exclamation mark at the end and three of the letter a. Occassionally it differs, but only when someone is bellowing it and only when it is to show that it is longer than usual.

Lastly, going back to zhar, I don’t pronounce it like jar (in fact, I almost always say zar, like a Russian Tzar), but was curious as to people’s opinions as to zar or a z-ed version of sh, sort of like zshar (maybe imagine Sean Connery saying it, lol).

P.S. Throbbling is now a word.

Thommy H:

yet they have coined it to always have an exclamation mark at the end and three of the letter a
It is sometimes written longer though - there was an issue of White Dwarf way back that was taken over by Orks (I think when Gorkamorka came out) and it was written across two pages with about a two dozen 'a's. That was my point: that you can make it much, much longer, and that doesn't work if you have to stick a 'g' sound on the end.

Also, try saying the name of greenskin armies with a hard g - "Waaaagh Grimgor" is awkward to say if it's "Waaaarg Grimgor", but flows quite nicely if it's "Waaaa Grimgor".

Willmark:

I’d tend to agree with you Thommy if we were talking UK English… (which conceivably we are since its a UL game…)

The problem is that for a speaker of American English (yes I know all the folks on the other side of the pond are cringing) we tend to pronounce things literally. Add to the fact of different spellings (colour anyone?). I think this is reflective of the societies in general.

Think about my example: colour is indicative of its French influence on UK English. In the US we have very, very little French influence on the spoken word, but a surprising number of others based on the melting pot concept of so many different races and ethnicities. Add to this the literal pronuciations as I mentioned and I see why we use the"g".

In short in America I would not be surprised to hear the “g” in Waaaagh and would not think it all that unusual.

Thommy H:

Actually, the French influence on English comes from way, way before the American continent was even settled by Europeans! We’re talking 1066, so American English has as much French influence as British English: it’s a fundamental part of the language, and it’s why we have two words for everything (“big” and “large”, “hot” and “warm”, etc.) - one word is French origin and the other German.

The variation in spellings comes from the fact that there weren’t any standard spellings in the 16th and 17th Centuries (as the printing press hadn’t been invented) so colour was as likely to be spelled both ways - and several others - in England too. Shakespeare, famously, almost never spelt his own name the same way twice! When spellings began to get formalised, America and Britain were already separate nations and they made their own arbitrary decisions about how to do things. Neither way is ‘correct’ or ‘original’; both language come from a common ancestor that was different from both. British people tend to think American English is a corrupted version of British English, but the truth is that they’re both ‘corrupted’ versions of Early Modern English!

But this doesn’t have much to do with pronunciation, which is just about cultural drift. Americans do tend to be more literal with their spellings (though still not literal enough for most foreign speakers - all the same silly things we’ve mentioned already are still in there) but I’d still be quite surprised to hear an American use a hard g at the end of Waaagh.

Anonymouse:

(there is some evidence that the k and gh in "knight" used to be pronounced) as dictionaries were constructed.

Here is a little more on 'gh':
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gh_(digraph)#English

cornixt
What about kniggit?

Willmark:

“Now go away before I taunt you a second time”