Age Old Grudges

Yeah I was offered this on holiday but politely declined for some strange reason. I guess I’m just not adventurous lol.

Still not the worst local dish I’ve been offered on holiday though.

EDIT: Typo

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Haha! I did check off the list of things not allowed to be sent abroad, such as spray paints, but there was nothing about food. I also saw online shops which specialized in shipping exotic food abroad, including surströmming. Later, when I mentioned to my mother that I sent a can to you, she recoiled and said that it was illegal to ship food.

Either the rules have changed since she worked in the Swedish postal service two decades ago, or the rules about food was hidden somewhere else for some bureaucratic reason and I am technically an international criminal for sending you a mighty fine Swedish bio-weapon. :tongue:

@Habitual_Lurker : Nurgle approves!

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I think Nurgle wanted me to eat it tbh, but fortunately Hashut wanted me to eat rare steak instead.

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"Sardinian sheep milk cheese that contains live insect larvae (maggots). "

WT actual F!!
Do people really eat that??? :shock:

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People certainly CLAIM they eat it when tourists are around. It’s still not as disgusting as balut, which I almost ate accidentally in Caloocan.

(I was originally intending to link a description of balut, but it’s genuinely so disgusting that I decided not to for the sake of the squeamish. Look it up if you want to know, but I’d recommend not doing it while eating.)

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Don’t know if this is a language thing, but…who makes soup from berries? :thinking:

Humans. Or at least their factories. :tongue:

You boil the berries and get a nice drink. It can be mixed with milk and other things. The unmixed stuff is popular warmed during winter when skiing. There are cranes out of walls connected to buckets full of hot blueberry soup at the ski race Vasaloppet in February. The thicker variant is called blueberry cream, which is eaten together with milk by spoon.

You can also boil cherries with sugar and get spittie-soup, which you eat with a spoon and constantly have to spit out cherry stones. This is homebrew stuff and not sold in any store.

If I’m reading you right, we’d call that juice in English.

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Maybe like a smoothie consistency?

Road trip to Scandinavia to try it! I’ve seen Midsommar, I know what they like.

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My mind went here:

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Yes, something toward a smoothie consistency. A little thicker. Juice have a looser consistency than blueberry soup. There is also bluberry juice and the more common lingonberry juice. Coulis sounds similar.

Ah, you know what we like then! A big flowery phallus wainly disguised as a cross stuck into Mother Earth, around which people will dance and leap like frogs and sing silly songs before drinking their heads off on snaps. It’s not really Scandinavian without silly humour or phalli, check our Bronze Age petroglyphs for confirmation. Midsommar have both big phallus and silly humour.

By the way, my father started his carpentry firm the same year I was born, and his distinct company marking is a wooden phallus hanging between the “legs” of the roof. This small house type will serve as an example. Other companies know us instantly from this.

Speaking of which, I once followed a Lithuanian carpenter up into the mountains for a job. On the way there is a house around Mora or Orsa where the owners have put out a red wooden goat. As we drove past, he went silent and his head swivelled around as his staring eyes followed the wooden goat. Then he exclaimed in English as if he could not believe his eyes: “The goat has a dick!” And swore in Swedish: “Fy fan för svenskar!” (Roughly translated: “Bloody devil for Swedes!”)

The above anecdote may be of interest for @MichaelX , @Bloodbeard , @forgefire , @MadHatter , @denelian5 , @Fuggit_Khan and others. Heathen customs.

Sorry for derailing. We could break this side-track out and join with the Scandinavian sibling rivalry thread, or make a new one. I just don’t know how to do it yet in Discourse. I must be missing something. Wise @Oxymandias of the Beastman hooves, pretty please help? Or please explain in PM so you don’t get called on again. :smile:

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As requested @Admiral - thread moved :slight_smile:

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@Admiral
A wooden phallus?
Ha!
We have those everywhere here in Thailand, they’re considered to bring good luck and adorn numerous businesses and homes. I’ve even seen them on key chains and on the hoods of cars. And pouring whiskey on the wooden phallus supposedly gives a bit more bang for your buck, so to speak.

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Not surprising all these people are fascinated with ornamental phallus especially, when you consider the root of the word in English.

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Make one think of ancient Roman towns where phallus sculptures would point towards brothels - amazing

And no. I’m not making a “phallic sculpture” splinter thread :joy::joy::joy:

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I was actually asked to leave a posh charity fundraiser once by my boss, just because I was explaining to a very, very fancy potential donor why the hat she was wearing was called a fascinator. With pictures.

Still, you’ve gotta find your fun where you can, and I get very bored at these events.

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Dare I ask for the explanation? :sweat:

Is that why the capital is called ‘Bang Cock’? :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes:

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I mean I’m no language expert, but if it’s from the same derivation as the verb “to fascinate” then it’s originally from this:

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@Lord_of_Uzkulak
Ha! :joy:
Well no, not really…“Bangkok” isn’t even the real Thai name.
Nobody here calls it that (except for talking with a tourist).
The real name of “Bangkok” is
“Krung Thep Mahanakhon Amon Rattanakosin Mahinthara Ayuthaya Mahadilok Phop Noppharat Ratchathani Burirom Udomratchaniwet Mahasathan Amon Piman Awatan Sathit Sakkathattiya Witsanukam Prasit”.
Yep, I kid you not.
The Thai simply say Krung Thep.
It’s kinda like “Japan”…the Japanese call themselves Nihonjin and their language as Nihongo. Never have they said Japan in their history.
… Both cases are just adopted Western names that are universally used throughout the world, even the people who live there never say it.
Anyways, back to the original topic :
Boo Sweden!
Bah humbug Denmark!
Scandinavian savages the both of you!

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